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TT Club

Shippers urged to take more responsibility for supply chain safety

International freight transport and logistics insurer TT Club wants cargo owners to be more aware of safety issues arising from poorly packed containers and misdeclared goods. Urging them to make good practice in the supply chain part of their ESG (environmental, social and governance) policies

London, 6th January 2021

TT Club’s analyses consistently indicate that two thirds of incidents related to cargo damage are caused or exacerbated by poor practices at the time of packing goods into a freight container. Such supply chain malpractice results in multi-million dollar losses, including tragic containership fires with loss of seafarers lives and significant delays. Extrapolating known figures, all such incidents are estimated to result in economic losses exceeding USD6 billion per year.

Cargo interests, whether retailers, manufacturers, traders, exporters and particularly importers, which rely so heavily on the global supply chains that transit thousands of miles of ocean and land transport need to take responsibility to ensure the risks are mitigated.

“The dangers are not just restricted to chemical cargoes, such as those used in paints, cosmetics, cleaning products, fertilisers, weedkillers and aerosols of all types. A wide variety of consumer goods, as well as components used in the manufacture of industrial products, domestics white goods and automobiles, if incorrectly handled in transit can cause major disasters,” comments Michael Yarwood, Managing Director, Loss Prevention at TT Club.

“The list is long and often surprising – BBQ charcoal, battery powered electronic devices, fireworks, hand sanitizer, wool, cotton, vegetable fibres, marble, granite and other building materials, fishmeal, seed cake and many more. Those involved in sourcing, importing, storing, supplying or selling such commodities should ensure their procurement and logistics standards are of the highest level.”

Sustainability and environmental impacts are subjects that are constantly in the public eye and there is an ever-heightened sense of urgency to act responsibly to reduce waste and the carbon footprint. However, the risks of supply chain dereliction frequently go unnoticed. Yet, mishandling of cargoes can result in unacceptable danger to those employed in their movement, to the environment, the general public, and not insignificantly to brand reputations.

And the concerns extend far beyond awareness of commodity-specific risks. Packaging and dunnaging already need to comply with safety and environmental standards, but there are increasing demands around recyclable and biodegradable materials. Furthermore, international attention is being directed urgently at phytosanitary risks – the avoidance of visible pest contamination in the movement of freight. Since not every responsible actor will physically see the potential contaminants, it is a matter of considering the origin of the goods being sourced, the location for packing, the season and biology of pests (when eggs or seeds are most likely), the compliance of the required packaging and the prevailing conditions at the time of packing the container(s).

As CSR (corporate social responsibility) and ESG policies come under increasing scrutiny, those entities that profit from the efficiencies and opportunities of the global and regional supply chains need now to be confident that those acting on their behalf in preparing, packaging, packing and dispatching their goods are doing so in accordance with industry standards, and within the applicable regulatory frameworks.

“So, what are ‘industry standards’? The simple answer is the Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU Code),” advises Yarwood. “This is a joint publication of IMO[1], ILO[2] and UNECE[3]. It provides comprehensive information on all aspects of packing and securing of cargo in freight containers and other transport units across all sea and land transport modes. The Code guides not only those responsible for packing and securing cargo, but also those who receive and unpack the goods. It also addresses the vital issue of correct description and declaration of the goods, including any specific information about the treatment of dangerous goods.”

The full CTU Code is most comprehensive, but for those wishing to navigate it for guidance on their particular function or commodity, it might appear a little complex, especially for those unfamiliar with the processes. TT Club has therefore, along with its fellow partners in the Cargo Integrity Group*, compiled a ‘Quick Guide’ to the Code. This includes a Checklist of actions and responsibilities for those packing cargoes in freight containers specifically. The aim is to make the Code accessible to as many operatives as possible, encouraging them to adhere to the good practices that it specifies.

The complexity of supply chain relationships across the globe makes it no easy task to achieve material change in behaviour and practice. It is recognised that beneficial cargo owners, and in particular buyers and retailers, often hold an influential position in the supply chain and can exercise control on the way that specifications and contracts are drawn up between entities. They are regarded as vital in disseminating good practice information and insisting on compliance by those suppliers of goods and services who they employ either directly or indirectly.

The Global Shippers Forum (GSF) represents the interests of cargo owners in international supply chains. James Hookham, Secretary General, recognises the crucial role cargo owners have in promoting high standards of safe and ecologically-responsible container packing, stating, “In addition to the serious health and safety risks already described, poorly packed containers can also cause damage to adjacent cargoes in the event of incident and have been a cause of major consequential losses for shippers. GSF played a leading role in the development of the advice in the CTU Code and contributed to the writing of the ‘Quick Guide’ and the Container Packing Checklist.”

Furthermore, combatting the inadvertent transfer of invasive plant and animal species via contaminated cargoes and shipping containers is now a major priority for many governments around the world anxious to protect vital economic and ecological industries in agriculture and natural resources. The CTU Code and the associated guidance material sets out practical steps that can be taken to minimise this real and serious threat to trading nations.

James Hookham concluded, “Insofar as these practices will help minimise the impact of cargo movements on the environment and on people that come into contact with them, they are a valid item for inclusion on the ESG agenda of all responsible businesses.”

[1] International Maritime Organization www.imo.org

[2] International Labour Organization www.ilo.org

[3] United Nations Economic Commission for Europe www.unece.org

* Container Owners Association (COA), the Global Shippers Forum (GSF), the International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association (ICHCA) and the World Shipping Council (WSC).

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com


[1] International Maritime Organization www.imo.org

[2] International Labour Organization www.ilo.org

[3] United Nations Economic Commission for Europe www.unece.org

Young International Freight Forwarder of the Year announced

Umair Aamir Sheikh

Geneva/London, 10 December 2020 – FIATA International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations and TT Club announce the 2020 winner of the Young International Freight Forwarder of the Year Award (YIFFYA). Umair Aamir Sheikh from the Pakistan International Freight Forwarders Association, and Asia-Pacific regional winner, is awarded this year’s global award.

The YIFFYA demonstrates recognition by FIATA, and TT Club as a sponsoring partner of the award, of the need to develop quality in the freight forwarding industry and reward young talent. For over 20 years, the YIFFYA has been providing valuable training opportunities for young freight forwarders in the industry.

“In the face of such a difficult year due to the pandemic, we are heartened to receive very high-quality dissertations from all four FIATA regions,” said Thomas Sim, FIATA Senior Vice President. “Candidates have demonstrated tenacity, versatility and high standards of research and applications in their various domains and areas of operations. FIATA’s continuous efforts towards nurturing and motivating the youth in logistics and freight forwarding will persist in the face of our industry’s disruption and digital transformation.”

Sheikh joined the freight forwarding industry four years ago and comes from a country where 64% of the population is under 30 years old – emphasizing the relevance and timeliness of this award. His dissertation took into account the effects of digitalization on freight forwarding activities and concluded that, despite the technology currently available, the role of the freight forwarder remains essential.

The YIFFYA selects four regional winners who are invited to attend the annual FIATA World Congress. The global winner is usually announced during the congress and receives, as part of the prize, one week’s practical experience of multimodal transport infrastructure and one-week academic training in the TT Club’s Head Office in London.

“This year more than ever we at TT want to pay tribute to the freight forwarding fraternity across the world that have helped keep essential global supply chains flowing,” said Mike Yarwood, TT Club’s Managing Director, Loss Prevention. “In turn the young, talented employees of these regional and international companies have excelled. The entries into YIFFA and particularly the finalists have exemplified this talent and dedication. In addition to Sheikh, I want to congratulate them all, and in particular the regional finalists: Femke Marie Fürst (DSLV – Germany) ; Vimbai Loreen Manyumbu (SFAAZ – Zimbabwe) and Anastasia Gureeva (CIFFA – Canada)

One of FIATA’s key priorities is to bring new talent into the freight transport industry to meet the need for human resources in the coming years. The YIFFYA provides young professionals looking to develop their knowledge with networking opportunities. FIATA encourages young freight forwarders from Association Members to apply for the award to get global exposure to the industry.

About FIATA

FIATA International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations is a nongovernmental, membership-based organization representing freight forwarders in some 150 countries. FIATA’s membership is composed of 108 Associations Members and more than 5,800 Individual Members, overall representing an industry of 40,000 freight forwarding and logistics firms worldwide. Based in Geneva, FIATA is ‘the global voice of freight logistics’ www.fiata.com.

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1,100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

CTU Code ‘Quick Guide’ now available in Mandarin

The Cargo Integrity Group makes its recently published ‘CTU Code – a Quick Guide’ available in the Mandarin language to further its campaign for the adoption and implementation of crucial safety practices throughout the global supply chain.

25 November, 2020

The organisations, which comprise the Cargo Integrity Group (CIG), strongly believe that more widespread use of, and adherence to, the IMO/ILO/UNECE Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU Code) and the packing practices and techniques it covers will dramatically increase the safety and security of the global container supply chain. Many incidences of container fires aboard ships, landside conflagrations, container stack failures, vehicle rollovers, train derailments, internal cargo collapses and incidents of invasive pest contamination, can be traced to poor packing practices.

The five international freight transport and cargo handling organisations that are collaborating under the Cargo Integrity banner are the Container Owners Association (COA), the Global Shippers Forum (GSF), ICHCA International, TT Club and the World Shipping Council (WSC). In September, the group published materials in English to provide ready guidance to the CTU Code, including a Checklist of actions and responsibilities of those undertaking the packing of cargoes in freight containers specifically. This is now also available in Mandarin Chinese HERE

The group recognised that the full CTU Code, together with its annexes and further ‘informative material’, comprises hundreds of pages of text. This comprehensive body of guidance provides all parties in the supply chain with information about their responsibilities, details of how to pack, secure packages and cargo items and takes account of diverse forces encountered during transport, load distribution and the capability to brace and secure effectively. It also places responsibility on the shipper to declare correctly the composition of the cargo. However, its sheer size and comprehensiveness militates against its easy usage and application to all cargo types. The Quick Guide aims to provide a ready route map for all actors in the supply chain.

It is important for the CTU Code to be as accessible as possible to as many operatives as possible and the aspiration is that this Quick Guide, which distils the Code into just thirteen well-illustrated pages, will encourage them to learn how the Code can be applied to their own particular needs.

It is the intention of the organisations in the Cargo Integrity Group to make the Quick Guide available in other languages as a key part of its dissemination programme and further translations are planned during 2021.

ENDS

NOTES FOR EDITORS

  1. The five organisations co-operating in the Cargo integrity Group are:
  • Container Owners Association (COA)

Media Contact: Patrick Hicks, Secretary, Container Owners Association, secretary@containerownersassociation.org

  • Global Shippers Forum (GSF)

Media contact: James Hookham, Secretary General, jhookham@globalshippersforum.com Tel: +44 7818 45 04 40

  • International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association (ICHCA International)

Media contact: Maria Udy, Portcare International, maria@portcare.com

  • TT Club

Media contact: Peter Owen, Portcare International, info@portcare.com

Tel: +44 1737 248300

  • World Shipping Council (WSC)

Media contact: Anna Larsson, Communications Director: alarsson@worldshipping.org

Tel: +47 484 06 919

  1. PDF copies of the published documents are available HERE

Copyright exists in these documents but reproduction in whole or part is permitted subject to acknowledgement of the source.

  1. The CTU Code is the Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units jointly published by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). Copies are available for download here: http://www.imo.org/en/OurWork/Safety/Cargoes/CargoSecuring/Documents/1497.pdf

https://www.unece.org/trans/wp24/guidelinespackingctus/intro.html

Truckers Get More Help on Safe Parking

Motorway Buddy, the app to assist road hauliers and drivers to accurately plan their overnight parking, has been enhanced with UK police-sourced theft and vehicle interference data to identify safer parking options.

London, 24 November 2020

The upgrade to the app, which has already been downloaded 130,000 times and used over three million times, has been made possible by a unique partnership between Motorway Buddy, freight industry insurer TT Club and NaVCIS Freight, part of the  National Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service, a UK National police unit.

Police theft and incident data is used by NaVCIS Freight to produce a “heat map” illustrating vulnerable parking locations that is overlaid onto Motorway Buddy’s existing search engine for overnight parking. In addition to crimes reported to the police, the app’s new functionality also allows drivers to upload reports of suspicious incidents that do not necessarily warrant police action at the time, this information will be disseminated via subsequent updates.

Chris Holloway, ex-trucker and Motorway Buddy pioneer, remarks, “I am particularly pleased that with the support of TT Club and the cooperation of NaVCIS the app can become even more valuable in helping not just drivers but also the haulage companies identify safer overnight stops and pay charges online.  The heat map is dynamic and updated on a regular basis.  The locator tool and zoom-in facility are easily used and provide flexibility in the case of traffic congestion and other delays.”

The screenshot below illustrates the overlaid map and more detail can be accessed here https://motorwaybuddy.com/

Speaking on behalf of TT Club, Mike Yarwood Managing Director Loss Prevention said, “As a mutual insurer specialising in the international freight business we are committed to supporting efforts to minimise risk, loss and damage to freight and cargo carrying assets.  The latest additional functionality of the Motorway Buddy App helps hauliers lower their risk profile. Fuel syphoning can be a particular problem.  It represents a financial loss to the haulier, which is often unrecoverable as the value is below the excess stipulated on many insurance policies.  The cumulative cost of these occurrences along with other less serious damage to vehicles can become significant.”

In addition to information on over 300 truck stops, frequently used lay-bys and other informal parking sites are covered by the app and the newly installed ‘heat map’.  The latest NaVCIS data emphasises the risks of utilising these informal, unsecured areas.  So far this year, of the 3,200+ cases handled by the unit 51% occurred in such locations.  The diagram below provides more detail of these cases, the cargo value of which amounted to nearly £74 million.  Further anecdotal evidence points to an even greater proportion of the more minor, currently unreported incidents, also taking place in these areas.

“Our goal,” concludes Holloway, “is to encourage a far bigger use of truck stops; for these facilities to be even better secured and patrolled than they are at the moment and for more locations to be developed.  Our app will better inform drivers and haulage companies in their decision-making, heighten demand for more secure locations and to reduce crime both officially logged and currently unreported.”

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

About Motorway Buddy (MWB) App

The Motorway Buddy smart phone App is an established suite of products recognised by UK government and trade organisations as the go-to truck-stop locator for UK and European drivers. The App was developed in 2011 by a former HGV driver, as a driver friendly compliance and safety management tool. The App provides the location of over 300 recognised truck stop facilities across the United Kingdom. The App is currently available in English, Romanian and Polish.

https://motorwaybuddy.com/

For more information on how to support the work of the NaVCIS’ Freight Unit and to help mitigate the risk of cargo theft, please contact freight@navcis.pnn.police.uk

Brexit web resource for the freight industry

Recognising the complexities and the uncertainties that the upcoming consequences of Brexit will bring for all stakeholders in the UK and EU, international freight transport insurer, TT Club has launched a Brexit webpage resource in an attempt to bring clarity.

London, 27th October 2020

TT’s aim in providing this online resource is to collate, in a single accessible location, a wide variety of available information that is likely to be of importance to its Members and entities across all jurisdictions and disciplines in the freight supply chain.* Through researched articles and the webpage’s dynamic frequently asked questions area, TT will endeavour to develop practical guidance and advice in relation to the complex challenges that have already arisen and will continue to emerge in the wake of Brexit.

What is clear is that the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK) has left the European Union (EU) and in doing so will also leave the EU’s Single Market and Customs Union. The end of the current transition period on 31 December 2020 is now fast approaching, after which import and export declarations will be required, regardless of whether a trade deal is agreed between the UK and the EU.

“As a result, there will be significant changes to the current processes of moving goods between the UK and the EU. However, Northern Ireland (NI) will be subject to a different regime under the NI Protocol”, states Mike Yarwood Managing Director Loss Prevention at TT. “All stakeholders involved in the cross-border movement of goods will need to be aware of the changes, make appropriate decisions and adjust systems and processes at the earliest opportunity to avoid unnecessary disruption.”

Acknowledging that the Club’s membership spans not only both the UK and the EU, but also globally, the site will strive to maintain a balanced approach to the provision of information that will be to the benefit of all, regardless of their location.

The changes will inevitably have an impact on the operations of diverse stakeholders in the supply chain to a greater or lesser degree. Through its webpage resource TT aims to inform as many as possible across the industry — whether its drivers, haulage companies, freight forwarders, customs agencies, logistics operators or port operators.

Unfortunately, of course, many issues are yet to be clarified at government level and until such time that there is definitive guidance on customs procedures, trade agreements and solutions to potential transport disruption, no supply chain stakeholder will have the knowledge to prepare themselves entirely. TT’s webpage will continue to be updated through the process and respond to identified industry concerns.

* https://www.ttclub.com/products-and-services/loss-prevention/brexit/

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

TT Club focusses on temperature-controlled cargo losses

The leading international freight transport and logistics insurer, TT Club has drawn attention to action required to reduce perishable cargo losses and refrigerated container failures and damage

London, 22 October, 2020

Analysis of the specialist insurer’s claims records for transport operators over the past three years shows temperature-controlled incidents ranking in third place. Almost 30% of these incidents involved a miscommunication of operational instructions on care of the cargo with a further 23% down to temperature setting errors. Reefer equipment failure or damage accounted for a quarter of the claims. Please see the attached infographic.

TT continues in its attempts to minimise losses for both its Members and all those involved in the cool supply chain with publicly available guidance documents such as StopLoss – Temperature Controlled Cargo, and increasingly via online webinars. The latest was held last week, entitled ‘Warm or cold: is it a game?’. With expert speakers, this forum contained causational information as well as advice on risk avoidance. A recording is available here.

“Our own experiences and the data drawn from our claims history was reinforced by over a third of webinar attendees, who when asked their perception of the primary risk factors, pointed to communications errors with ambiguous or incorrect instructions passed between supply chain stakeholders,” commented Mike Yarwood, TT’s Loss Prevention Managing Director.

The sensitivity of many commodities transported under temperature-controlled conditions puts the care of the product both before and during transit as a paramount concern. During TT’s webinar, Carsten Jensen, a consultant and surveyor specialising in perishable goods transport gave a comprehensive insight into the five key aspects that impinge on loss prevention: product quality; preparation of the goods; correct packaging and stowing; attention to temperature irregularities and prolonged storage and transit.

“Clearly a number of these processes are outwith the control of forwarder, carrier and terminal operator,” commented Yarwood. “But as the demand for unitised transport of perishables continues its upward trend, it is vital that the transport links in the chain become more informed about all the relevant processes to improve the collaborative efforts of all stakeholders.”

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

South Africa remains a top hotspot for cargo crime

New report highlights country’s ongoing vulnerability to cargo theft as well as the trends during the first half of 2020. These include:

  • Hijacking of vehicles in transit is the primary theft type
  • Theft from facilities is on the rise
  • Johannesburg and surrounding province remain chief region at risk
  • An uptick in incidents of cargo theft in Eastern and Western Cape
  • Food and beverages and medical supplies have seen an elevated number of thefts in Q2

London, 13October 2020

Having collaborated over the last three years to produce global reports on the incidence of cargo theft, international freight transport insurer TT Club and BSI, the business improvement company, have once again come together to highlight risk; this time, specifically focusing in on South Africa. The report, entitled ‘Freight Crime in South African Supply Chains’ is made possible by fusing the threat and intelligence data and analysis from BSI’s Supply Chain Risk Exposure Evaluation Network (SCREEN) and TT Club’s insurance risk management and loss prevention insights. The full report is downloadable here .

South Africa ranks among the top countries in the world, and first on the African continent, for BSI’s forecasted losses due to cargo theft, underscoring the significant economic impact of this issue in the nation. Historically, there is an inverse relationship between crime and economic growth in South Africa. However, this year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of lockdowns and a decline in the economy, an additional layer was added to that relationship.

The economic decline, along with the changes brought about by a restrictive lockdown in response to COVID-19 earlier this year, left the freight sector in a vulnerable situation. South Africa is an environment traditionally characterised by cargo truck hijackings. Further, cross-border truck congestion and slower freight clearance created secondary disruptions that leave cargo even more susceptible to theft and general violence.    

The attached graphic – Cargo Theft Trends South Africa –  illustrates statistics from both the South African Police Service (SAPS) and news sources, in addition to those recorded by BSI’s SCREEN, and underlines the typical characteristics of cargo thefts occurring in the country. In total, three key trends resulted from BSI and TT’s research in 2019 and 2020: thefts from facilities increased during the first half of 2020; an uptick in incidents of cargo theft occurred in Eastern Cape and Western Cape between the first two quarters of 2020; and thefts of food and beverage and medical supplies increased in Q2 2020. The report’s authors emphasise that the understanding of cargo theft risk plays a big part in mitigating both the occurrence and impact of these incidents on stakeholders’ organisations and is crucial in building a truly resilient supply chain.

Mike Yarwood, TT Club’s Loss Prevention Managing Director stated, “As cargo theft continues to impact business operations and disrupt supply chains in South Africa and elsewhere, it is vital that companies stay on top of potential threats and risks. Security awareness and proactive risk management actions are essential steps in creating a risk-averse supply chain. In highlighting causal influences this report also points the way to how preventative measures can, and must, be introduced and enhanced to reverse the damaging trends.”

David Fairnie, BSI Principal Consultant for Supply Chain Security  added, “Understanding the threats in South Africa, detailed in this report, and incorporating the suggested preventative measures, including screening employees, implementing security management systems, and securing parking depots, will help organisations work towards developing more secure and resilient supply chains.”

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

About BSI:

BSI is the business improvement company that enables organizations to turn standards of best practice into habits of excellence. For over a century BSI has championed what good looks like and driven best practice in organizations around the world. Working with over 84,000 clients across 193 countries, it is a truly international business with skills and experience across a number of sectors including automotive, aerospace, built environment, food, and healthcare. Through its expertise in Standards Development and Knowledge Solutions, Assurance and Professional Services, BSI improves business performance to help clients grow sustainably, manage risk and ultimately be more resilient.

To learn more, please visit: www.bsigroup.com

BSI SCREEN Intelligence:

Supply Chain Risk Exposure Evaluation Network (SCREEN), is BSI’s web-based, comprehensive global supply chain intelligence system. SCREEN is the most complete, publicly available Supply Chain Security, Corporate Social Responsibility, Food Safety/Fraud, and Business Continuity intelligence and analysis resource used to measure country-level risk factors through BSI’s 25 proprietary country-level supply chain risk ratings. SCREEN’s unique, proprietary global supply chain risk data and analysis helps organisations identify and understand where their supply chain risks exist. SCREEN generates trade interruption updates, BSI-authored special reports on major disruption incidents and trends as well as insights and analyses on supply chain topics, countermeasure programs, and risk mitigation best practices to help protect supply chains worldwide. SCREEN’s intelligence provides organisations with full transparency of country risks and helps them to make intelligent risk-based decisions that drive resilience.

TT Club Underlines its Commitment to the Middle East Market

TT Club has appointed Abdul Fahl to take up the role of TTMS (Gulf) Director. The move follows the return to London from Dubai of Julien Horn who will continue in the position of Portfolio Underwriter for the Middle East, Eastern Med and African region and reiterates the TT’s long-standing commitment to provide insurance solutions and unique support for its regional Membership and brokers.

Dubai & London, 30th September, 2020

The TT Club is committed to its Middle East and African Membership and is looking to build upon the successful growth and enhanced local service achieved by Julien Horn during his time in Dubai.  Recognising the importance of a local contact and real-time assistance for its growing customer base in these regions, TT has announced the executive appointment of Abdul Fahl.

Abdul Fahl, TTMS (Gulf) Director

After six and a half years with TTMS(Gulf), the transport and logistics specialist’s well-established joint venture Network Partner in Dubai, Julien Horn has returned to TT’s headquarters in London to continue in his role as Portfolio Senior Underwriter, and leader of his underwriting team. Julien will be focused on ensuring Members continue to receive the highest level of quality and bespoke underwriting service across the Middle East, Eastern Mediterranean and African regions.

In announcing the move Mark Argentieri, TT Club’s Regional Director, EMEA said, “Julien has done a great job increasing TT’s presence in the region and providing on-the-spot support to our local Membership. He has strengthened relationships with not only our Members, but also brokers and local stakeholders, his success has led directly to an increase in our Membership in the region. As Julien returns to London to continue his underwriting duties, our team there will benefit hugely from his ‘on the ground’ experience.  His presence alongside his underwriters, will undoubtedly bring benefits to our goal of enhancing our tailored service.”

Julien Horn, Portfolio Underwriter for the Middle East, Eastern Med and African region

Abdul Fahl has now taken over from Julien as TTMS (Gulf) Director in Dubai. Abdul brings a wealth of diverse experience in both claims and legal affairs.  In addition to filling the roles of Claims Executive and Senior Claims Executive during his seven and a half year career at TT Club in London, Abdul has worked within the industry for a number of years at a major shipping line. Abdul has a master degree in maritime law and speaks Arabic, skills which we are confident will add further benefit to the region’s Members. Abdul will be spearheading the development of TT’s regional growth, while continuing the focus on local bespoke services to our existing Members and their brokers in the region.

Abdul’s past contributions to TT service have been many and varied; his claims handling, business development and extensive loss prevention work through seminars and more recently webinars have benefited both Members and the wider industry.  In his new position Abdul will drive forward a number of local initiatives in support of TT’s mission to make the transport and logistics industry safer and more secure.

“It is fantastic to have Abdul ready and able to step in to build upon Julien’s great work in the region” said Argentieri.  “His presence in Dubai, will assure Members of our continued drive for the very best standard of service for which TT has become rightly known.  In his new position, Abdul will be adept at introducing new ways to deliver added value and local service through vital local two-way communication to an expanding regional Membership.”

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

Global Groups Collaborate on Container Safety Improvements

JOINT MEDIA STATEMENT

On behalf of Container Owners Association, Global Shippers Forum, ICHCA International, TT Club, World Shipping Council

1600 BST Monday 14 September 2020

Five international freight transport and cargo handling organisations are collaborating on the production of new guidance on packing standards for freight containers and other cargo transport units.   The Container Owners Association, the Global Shippers Forum, the International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association, the TT Club and the World Shipping Council are co-operating on a range of activities to further the adoption and implementation of crucial safety practices throughout the global supply chain. 

As part of this longstanding cooperation, the five organisations have today published a ‘Quick Guide’ to the United Nations sponsored Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (the CTU Code), together with a Checklist of actions and responsibilities for the guidance of those undertaking the packing of cargoes in freight containers specifically.

Dedicated to improving the safety, security and environmental performance throughout the logistics supply chain, one of the aims of this collaboration is to promote awareness and wider use of the IMO/ILO/UNECE Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units – the CTU Code.

There have been several widely reported container fires aboard ships, where containerised cargoes may have been the cause of, or contributed to, such fires. The organisations believe that consistent, widespread and diligent adherence to the CTU Code by all parties within global CTU supply chains would significantly reduce these types of incidents, some of which have resulted in fatalities and serious injuries amongst ships’ crews and shore-side staff.

Other occurrences, such as container stack failures, vehicle roll-overs, train derailments, internal cargo collapses and incidents of invasive pest contamination, can also be traced to poor packing practices. The organisations believe that a greater awareness of the CTU Code and the packing practices and techniques it contains will help to reduce such incidents.

To do this the organisations are working together as the Cargo Integrity Group and have identified the following four areas of activity to raise the awareness and improve understanding of safe cargo packing practices:

  1. Promoting awareness and adoption of the CTU Code, of which the guidance material published today is an example.
  2. Seeking changes in regulatory requirements to improve their clarity, application, implementation and enforcement, including to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code.Monitoring of CTU packing performance through support for strengthened cargo screening
  3. processes and more effective container inspection regimes
  4. Working with other industry and governmental stakeholders in promoting awareness and better understanding of safe cargo packing and handling practices.

The five organisations each commented on today’s announcements:

Improving understanding of the CTU Code’s many requirements is central to the work of the group, as Capt. Richard Brough OBE of ICHCA International explains:

“A key objective of our mission is promoting awareness of the CTU Code. We have a dedicated set of outcomes designed to achieve this aim, which begins with the publication of our ‘CTU Code – a Quick Guide’. We want the Code to be as accessible to as many operatives as possible and hope this Quick Guide will encourage them to learn how the Code can be applied to their own particular needs.”

Lars Kjaer from WSC comments on another of the Group’s objectives,

“We believe it is important to pro-actively review and, where needed, revise existing regulatory provisions to enhance ship, crew and worker safety,” he explains. “For example, working closely with other partners, we have been able to ensure the launching of a considered review of the maritime Special Provisions in the IMO’s International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code. Such Special Provisions may today lead to exemptions from the Code’s safety and documentary requirements with the result that the carrier may not be able to take necessary precautionary measures.”

Other significant steps have been made in recent months with initiatives to screen cargo effectively, particularly responding to the concerns over the mis-declaration of shipments.

“Carriers have been advancing their capability to screen cargo at the time of booking in order to combat the curses of error and fraud that cause misdeclarations and unacceptable risk for the industry,” says TT Club’s Peregrine Storrs-Fox. “Such actions can also support and empower industry and government sponsored container inspection programmes that are fundamental to improving good practice and understanding how regulations actually operate. It is thus part of CIG’s third objective to participate in the ongoing revision of the IMO Circular regarding container inspection programmes and support related industry cargo screening initiatives.”

Uffe Ernst-Frederiksen of the Container Owners Association commented on a further key aspect of the new documents:

“The IMO/ILO/UNECE CTU Code describes in chapter 4 the roles and responsibilities of parties in the container supply chain for the safe packing, handling, stowage and transport of containers and the correct reporting of their actual weights”

“However, often overlooked is that the CTU Code also deals with supply chain parties’ responsibilities to minimize visible pest contamination from containers and their cargoes. It is therefore appropriate that the material we are publishing today draws attention to this important issue, stressing that minimizing pest contamination of containers and their cargoes is a shared responsibility. Our material also makes reference to guidance material recently developed and published by the IPPC’s Sea Container Task Force of which COA is a member that aims at assisting parties in the containerized supply chains in trying to ensure that containers and their cargoes remain free from visible pest contamination. One of the key objectives of the SCTF is to promote voluntary government-industry cooperation on minimizing pest contamination of CTUs. Our five organizations fully support this objective and call on all parties in the international containerized supply chains to actively support and participate in such voluntary programs, and to play their role in meeting the objective of minimizing visible pest contamination.”

Perhaps the greatest challenge in minimising cargo-related issues is that of creating the necessary awareness throughout the huge number of businesses active in the shipment of goods by intermodal container and other types of cargo transport units. Connecting with other stakeholders, and through them with the wider industry and governmental agencies, is the fourth objective of the Group. James Hookham of GSF says,

“Today is a marker on a journey to raise wider awareness of this critical issue across the globe and adoption of safe practices. Our organisations cannot do this on their own and we are reaching out to other bodies in the supply chain and in governmental agencies to join with us in promoting high standards of the packing of all cargo transport units and understanding the inter-connectedness of differing objectives”.

The organisations would welcome the support and active assistance from other representative bodies, individual companies and governmental agencies committed to supporting and achieving the four objectives. Contact can be made through any of the organisations listed below.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

The five organisations co-operating in the Cargo integrity Group are:

• Container Owners Association (COA)
Media Contact: Patrick Hicks, Secretary, Container Owners Association,
secretary@containerownersassociation.org

• Global Shippers Forum (GSF)
Media contact: James Hookham, Secretary General, jhookham@globalshippersforum.com
Tel: +44 7818 45 04 40

• International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association (ICHCA International)
Media contact: Peter Owen, Portcare International, info@portcare.com
Tel: +44 1737 248300

• TT Club
Media contact: Peter Owen, Portcare International, info@portcare.com
Tel: +44 1737 248300

• World Shipping Council (WSC)
Media contact: Anne Marie Kappel, Vice President, Strategy & Communication,
akappel@worldshipping.org Tel: +1 202 589 1235

TT Club’s Signposts to a Digital Future

Leading freight transport and logistics insurer TT Club is reflecting the evolving digital landscape in its new logo and revamped website. Increased accessibility to data, information and streamlined processes are the key aims of the insurance specialist’s investments in digitisation

London, 2nd September, 2020

Although COVID-19 has accelerated digitalisation, TT had already embarked on its path to digital transformation.  Planned investment has now reached a stage were TM Connect has improved on the existing ClaimsTrac tool and a new website has allowed increased access to TT’s valued loss prevention advisory services.  Such digital advances will increasingly allow TT to work in more innovative ways, adding value for its insured through the application of robotics, artificial intelligence, mining big data and other digital functionality.

As part of its 50th Anniversary celebrations in 2019, TT undertook to investigate what the next 25 years in the international logistics industry would bring. What it found was profound changes in the use of digital services*. “In responding to these findings our investment is taking increasing advantage of digital opportunities to enhance the customer facing elements of our business namely underwriting, claims fulfilment and loss prevention,” explained Charles Fenton, TT’s Chief Executive Officer. “Our new logo reflects TT’s focus on the digital sphere, by adapting the logo to work seamlessly in the on and offline world.”

TT Club’s risk management role, delivered through its loss prevention advisory service, is crucial to the protection of client’s operations across the multi-modal transport industry. The new website is in part designed to assist the access to such information, ensuring TT’s wealth of loss prevention articles and publications is available to not only its insured, but the industry as a whole. TT continues to explore multi-media channels through which to distribute their advice, including the new website, social media, TT’s series of successful seminars and its recently introduced programme of webinars.

TT’s investment in digitisation looks not only to improve access to loss prevention materials, but also to better aid its Members with the management of their insurance. Available via its website, TM Connect is TT’s new online services platform, developed by TT Club’s managers Thomas Miller. It is designed to enhance online accessibility to services and data for Members and their brokers. “TM Connect affords 24/7 access to all insurance documents, whether it is policies, payments and debit notes, premium balances or claims records. Indeed, the portal acts as successor to TT’s venerated ClaimsTrac and undoubtedly represents the future of communication with our Members” said Fenton.

These latest investments by TT Club are clear signposts to a digital future in which the technological opportunities that continue to present themselves will be investigated. TT intends to further exploit such opportunities as appropriate to better serve its clients as they tackle the dynamic challenges constantly presented throughout the global supply chain.

*The investigation’s report entitled ‘Brave New World’ can be found here

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com