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TT Club

TT Club focusses on temperature-controlled cargo losses

The leading international freight transport and logistics insurer, TT Club has drawn attention to action required to reduce perishable cargo losses and refrigerated container failures and damage

London, 22 October, 2020

Analysis of the specialist insurer’s claims records for transport operators over the past three years shows temperature-controlled incidents ranking in third place. Almost 30% of these incidents involved a miscommunication of operational instructions on care of the cargo with a further 23% down to temperature setting errors. Reefer equipment failure or damage accounted for a quarter of the claims. Please see the attached infographic.

TT continues in its attempts to minimise losses for both its Members and all those involved in the cool supply chain with publicly available guidance documents such as StopLoss – Temperature Controlled Cargo, and increasingly via online webinars. The latest was held last week, entitled ‘Warm or cold: is it a game?’. With expert speakers, this forum contained causational information as well as advice on risk avoidance. A recording is available here.

“Our own experiences and the data drawn from our claims history was reinforced by over a third of webinar attendees, who when asked their perception of the primary risk factors, pointed to communications errors with ambiguous or incorrect instructions passed between supply chain stakeholders,” commented Mike Yarwood, TT’s Loss Prevention Managing Director.

The sensitivity of many commodities transported under temperature-controlled conditions puts the care of the product both before and during transit as a paramount concern. During TT’s webinar, Carsten Jensen, a consultant and surveyor specialising in perishable goods transport gave a comprehensive insight into the five key aspects that impinge on loss prevention: product quality; preparation of the goods; correct packaging and stowing; attention to temperature irregularities and prolonged storage and transit.

“Clearly a number of these processes are outwith the control of forwarder, carrier and terminal operator,” commented Yarwood. “But as the demand for unitised transport of perishables continues its upward trend, it is vital that the transport links in the chain become more informed about all the relevant processes to improve the collaborative efforts of all stakeholders.”

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

South Africa remains a top hotspot for cargo crime

New report highlights country’s ongoing vulnerability to cargo theft as well as the trends during the first half of 2020. These include:

  • Hijacking of vehicles in transit is the primary theft type
  • Theft from facilities is on the rise
  • Johannesburg and surrounding province remain chief region at risk
  • An uptick in incidents of cargo theft in Eastern and Western Cape
  • Food and beverages and medical supplies have seen an elevated number of thefts in Q2

London, 13October 2020

Having collaborated over the last three years to produce global reports on the incidence of cargo theft, international freight transport insurer TT Club and BSI, the business improvement company, have once again come together to highlight risk; this time, specifically focusing in on South Africa. The report, entitled ‘Freight Crime in South African Supply Chains’ is made possible by fusing the threat and intelligence data and analysis from BSI’s Supply Chain Risk Exposure Evaluation Network (SCREEN) and TT Club’s insurance risk management and loss prevention insights. The full report is downloadable here .

South Africa ranks among the top countries in the world, and first on the African continent, for BSI’s forecasted losses due to cargo theft, underscoring the significant economic impact of this issue in the nation. Historically, there is an inverse relationship between crime and economic growth in South Africa. However, this year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of lockdowns and a decline in the economy, an additional layer was added to that relationship.

The economic decline, along with the changes brought about by a restrictive lockdown in response to COVID-19 earlier this year, left the freight sector in a vulnerable situation. South Africa is an environment traditionally characterised by cargo truck hijackings. Further, cross-border truck congestion and slower freight clearance created secondary disruptions that leave cargo even more susceptible to theft and general violence.    

The attached graphic – Cargo Theft Trends South Africa –  illustrates statistics from both the South African Police Service (SAPS) and news sources, in addition to those recorded by BSI’s SCREEN, and underlines the typical characteristics of cargo thefts occurring in the country. In total, three key trends resulted from BSI and TT’s research in 2019 and 2020: thefts from facilities increased during the first half of 2020; an uptick in incidents of cargo theft occurred in Eastern Cape and Western Cape between the first two quarters of 2020; and thefts of food and beverage and medical supplies increased in Q2 2020. The report’s authors emphasise that the understanding of cargo theft risk plays a big part in mitigating both the occurrence and impact of these incidents on stakeholders’ organisations and is crucial in building a truly resilient supply chain.

Mike Yarwood, TT Club’s Loss Prevention Managing Director stated, “As cargo theft continues to impact business operations and disrupt supply chains in South Africa and elsewhere, it is vital that companies stay on top of potential threats and risks. Security awareness and proactive risk management actions are essential steps in creating a risk-averse supply chain. In highlighting causal influences this report also points the way to how preventative measures can, and must, be introduced and enhanced to reverse the damaging trends.”

David Fairnie, BSI Principal Consultant for Supply Chain Security  added, “Understanding the threats in South Africa, detailed in this report, and incorporating the suggested preventative measures, including screening employees, implementing security management systems, and securing parking depots, will help organisations work towards developing more secure and resilient supply chains.”

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

About BSI:

BSI is the business improvement company that enables organizations to turn standards of best practice into habits of excellence. For over a century BSI has championed what good looks like and driven best practice in organizations around the world. Working with over 84,000 clients across 193 countries, it is a truly international business with skills and experience across a number of sectors including automotive, aerospace, built environment, food, and healthcare. Through its expertise in Standards Development and Knowledge Solutions, Assurance and Professional Services, BSI improves business performance to help clients grow sustainably, manage risk and ultimately be more resilient.

To learn more, please visit: www.bsigroup.com

BSI SCREEN Intelligence:

Supply Chain Risk Exposure Evaluation Network (SCREEN), is BSI’s web-based, comprehensive global supply chain intelligence system. SCREEN is the most complete, publicly available Supply Chain Security, Corporate Social Responsibility, Food Safety/Fraud, and Business Continuity intelligence and analysis resource used to measure country-level risk factors through BSI’s 25 proprietary country-level supply chain risk ratings. SCREEN’s unique, proprietary global supply chain risk data and analysis helps organisations identify and understand where their supply chain risks exist. SCREEN generates trade interruption updates, BSI-authored special reports on major disruption incidents and trends as well as insights and analyses on supply chain topics, countermeasure programs, and risk mitigation best practices to help protect supply chains worldwide. SCREEN’s intelligence provides organisations with full transparency of country risks and helps them to make intelligent risk-based decisions that drive resilience.

TT Club Underlines its Commitment to the Middle East Market

TT Club has appointed Abdul Fahl to take up the role of TTMS (Gulf) Director. The move follows the return to London from Dubai of Julien Horn who will continue in the position of Portfolio Underwriter for the Middle East, Eastern Med and African region and reiterates the TT’s long-standing commitment to provide insurance solutions and unique support for its regional Membership and brokers.

Dubai & London, 30th September, 2020

The TT Club is committed to its Middle East and African Membership and is looking to build upon the successful growth and enhanced local service achieved by Julien Horn during his time in Dubai.  Recognising the importance of a local contact and real-time assistance for its growing customer base in these regions, TT has announced the executive appointment of Abdul Fahl.

Abdul Fahl, TTMS (Gulf) Director

After six and a half years with TTMS(Gulf), the transport and logistics specialist’s well-established joint venture Network Partner in Dubai, Julien Horn has returned to TT’s headquarters in London to continue in his role as Portfolio Senior Underwriter, and leader of his underwriting team. Julien will be focused on ensuring Members continue to receive the highest level of quality and bespoke underwriting service across the Middle East, Eastern Mediterranean and African regions.

In announcing the move Mark Argentieri, TT Club’s Regional Director, EMEA said, “Julien has done a great job increasing TT’s presence in the region and providing on-the-spot support to our local Membership. He has strengthened relationships with not only our Members, but also brokers and local stakeholders, his success has led directly to an increase in our Membership in the region. As Julien returns to London to continue his underwriting duties, our team there will benefit hugely from his ‘on the ground’ experience.  His presence alongside his underwriters, will undoubtedly bring benefits to our goal of enhancing our tailored service.”

Julien Horn, Portfolio Underwriter for the Middle East, Eastern Med and African region

Abdul Fahl has now taken over from Julien as TTMS (Gulf) Director in Dubai. Abdul brings a wealth of diverse experience in both claims and legal affairs.  In addition to filling the roles of Claims Executive and Senior Claims Executive during his seven and a half year career at TT Club in London, Abdul has worked within the industry for a number of years at a major shipping line. Abdul has a master degree in maritime law and speaks Arabic, skills which we are confident will add further benefit to the region’s Members. Abdul will be spearheading the development of TT’s regional growth, while continuing the focus on local bespoke services to our existing Members and their brokers in the region.

Abdul’s past contributions to TT service have been many and varied; his claims handling, business development and extensive loss prevention work through seminars and more recently webinars have benefited both Members and the wider industry.  In his new position Abdul will drive forward a number of local initiatives in support of TT’s mission to make the transport and logistics industry safer and more secure.

“It is fantastic to have Abdul ready and able to step in to build upon Julien’s great work in the region” said Argentieri.  “His presence in Dubai, will assure Members of our continued drive for the very best standard of service for which TT has become rightly known.  In his new position, Abdul will be adept at introducing new ways to deliver added value and local service through vital local two-way communication to an expanding regional Membership.”

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

Global Groups Collaborate on Container Safety Improvements

JOINT MEDIA STATEMENT

On behalf of Container Owners Association, Global Shippers Forum, ICHCA International, TT Club, World Shipping Council

1600 BST Monday 14 September 2020

Five international freight transport and cargo handling organisations are collaborating on the production of new guidance on packing standards for freight containers and other cargo transport units.   The Container Owners Association, the Global Shippers Forum, the International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association, the TT Club and the World Shipping Council are co-operating on a range of activities to further the adoption and implementation of crucial safety practices throughout the global supply chain. 

As part of this longstanding cooperation, the five organisations have today published a ‘Quick Guide’ to the United Nations sponsored Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (the CTU Code), together with a Checklist of actions and responsibilities for the guidance of those undertaking the packing of cargoes in freight containers specifically.

Dedicated to improving the safety, security and environmental performance throughout the logistics supply chain, one of the aims of this collaboration is to promote awareness and wider use of the IMO/ILO/UNECE Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units – the CTU Code.

There have been several widely reported container fires aboard ships, where containerised cargoes may have been the cause of, or contributed to, such fires. The organisations believe that consistent, widespread and diligent adherence to the CTU Code by all parties within global CTU supply chains would significantly reduce these types of incidents, some of which have resulted in fatalities and serious injuries amongst ships’ crews and shore-side staff.

Other occurrences, such as container stack failures, vehicle roll-overs, train derailments, internal cargo collapses and incidents of invasive pest contamination, can also be traced to poor packing practices. The organisations believe that a greater awareness of the CTU Code and the packing practices and techniques it contains will help to reduce such incidents.

To do this the organisations are working together as the Cargo Integrity Group and have identified the following four areas of activity to raise the awareness and improve understanding of safe cargo packing practices:

  1. Promoting awareness and adoption of the CTU Code, of which the guidance material published today is an example.
  2. Seeking changes in regulatory requirements to improve their clarity, application, implementation and enforcement, including to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code.Monitoring of CTU packing performance through support for strengthened cargo screening
  3. processes and more effective container inspection regimes
  4. Working with other industry and governmental stakeholders in promoting awareness and better understanding of safe cargo packing and handling practices.

The five organisations each commented on today’s announcements:

Improving understanding of the CTU Code’s many requirements is central to the work of the group, as Capt. Richard Brough OBE of ICHCA International explains:

“A key objective of our mission is promoting awareness of the CTU Code. We have a dedicated set of outcomes designed to achieve this aim, which begins with the publication of our ‘CTU Code – a Quick Guide’. We want the Code to be as accessible to as many operatives as possible and hope this Quick Guide will encourage them to learn how the Code can be applied to their own particular needs.”

Lars Kjaer from WSC comments on another of the Group’s objectives,

“We believe it is important to pro-actively review and, where needed, revise existing regulatory provisions to enhance ship, crew and worker safety,” he explains. “For example, working closely with other partners, we have been able to ensure the launching of a considered review of the maritime Special Provisions in the IMO’s International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code. Such Special Provisions may today lead to exemptions from the Code’s safety and documentary requirements with the result that the carrier may not be able to take necessary precautionary measures.”

Other significant steps have been made in recent months with initiatives to screen cargo effectively, particularly responding to the concerns over the mis-declaration of shipments.

“Carriers have been advancing their capability to screen cargo at the time of booking in order to combat the curses of error and fraud that cause misdeclarations and unacceptable risk for the industry,” says TT Club’s Peregrine Storrs-Fox. “Such actions can also support and empower industry and government sponsored container inspection programmes that are fundamental to improving good practice and understanding how regulations actually operate. It is thus part of CIG’s third objective to participate in the ongoing revision of the IMO Circular regarding container inspection programmes and support related industry cargo screening initiatives.”

Uffe Ernst-Frederiksen of the Container Owners Association commented on a further key aspect of the new documents:

“The IMO/ILO/UNECE CTU Code describes in chapter 4 the roles and responsibilities of parties in the container supply chain for the safe packing, handling, stowage and transport of containers and the correct reporting of their actual weights”

“However, often overlooked is that the CTU Code also deals with supply chain parties’ responsibilities to minimize visible pest contamination from containers and their cargoes. It is therefore appropriate that the material we are publishing today draws attention to this important issue, stressing that minimizing pest contamination of containers and their cargoes is a shared responsibility. Our material also makes reference to guidance material recently developed and published by the IPPC’s Sea Container Task Force of which COA is a member that aims at assisting parties in the containerized supply chains in trying to ensure that containers and their cargoes remain free from visible pest contamination. One of the key objectives of the SCTF is to promote voluntary government-industry cooperation on minimizing pest contamination of CTUs. Our five organizations fully support this objective and call on all parties in the international containerized supply chains to actively support and participate in such voluntary programs, and to play their role in meeting the objective of minimizing visible pest contamination.”

Perhaps the greatest challenge in minimising cargo-related issues is that of creating the necessary awareness throughout the huge number of businesses active in the shipment of goods by intermodal container and other types of cargo transport units. Connecting with other stakeholders, and through them with the wider industry and governmental agencies, is the fourth objective of the Group. James Hookham of GSF says,

“Today is a marker on a journey to raise wider awareness of this critical issue across the globe and adoption of safe practices. Our organisations cannot do this on their own and we are reaching out to other bodies in the supply chain and in governmental agencies to join with us in promoting high standards of the packing of all cargo transport units and understanding the inter-connectedness of differing objectives”.

The organisations would welcome the support and active assistance from other representative bodies, individual companies and governmental agencies committed to supporting and achieving the four objectives. Contact can be made through any of the organisations listed below.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

The five organisations co-operating in the Cargo integrity Group are:

• Container Owners Association (COA)
Media Contact: Patrick Hicks, Secretary, Container Owners Association,
secretary@containerownersassociation.org

• Global Shippers Forum (GSF)
Media contact: James Hookham, Secretary General, jhookham@globalshippersforum.com
Tel: +44 7818 45 04 40

• International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association (ICHCA International)
Media contact: Peter Owen, Portcare International, info@portcare.com
Tel: +44 1737 248300

• TT Club
Media contact: Peter Owen, Portcare International, info@portcare.com
Tel: +44 1737 248300

• World Shipping Council (WSC)
Media contact: Anne Marie Kappel, Vice President, Strategy & Communication,
akappel@worldshipping.org Tel: +1 202 589 1235

TT Club’s Signposts to a Digital Future

Leading freight transport and logistics insurer TT Club is reflecting the evolving digital landscape in its new logo and revamped website. Increased accessibility to data, information and streamlined processes are the key aims of the insurance specialist’s investments in digitisation

London, 2nd September, 2020

Although COVID-19 has accelerated digitalisation, TT had already embarked on its path to digital transformation.  Planned investment has now reached a stage were TM Connect has improved on the existing ClaimsTrac tool and a new website has allowed increased access to TT’s valued loss prevention advisory services.  Such digital advances will increasingly allow TT to work in more innovative ways, adding value for its insured through the application of robotics, artificial intelligence, mining big data and other digital functionality.

As part of its 50th Anniversary celebrations in 2019, TT undertook to investigate what the next 25 years in the international logistics industry would bring. What it found was profound changes in the use of digital services*. “In responding to these findings our investment is taking increasing advantage of digital opportunities to enhance the customer facing elements of our business namely underwriting, claims fulfilment and loss prevention,” explained Charles Fenton, TT’s Chief Executive Officer. “Our new logo reflects TT’s focus on the digital sphere, by adapting the logo to work seamlessly in the on and offline world.”

TT Club’s risk management role, delivered through its loss prevention advisory service, is crucial to the protection of client’s operations across the multi-modal transport industry. The new website is in part designed to assist the access to such information, ensuring TT’s wealth of loss prevention articles and publications is available to not only its insured, but the industry as a whole. TT continues to explore multi-media channels through which to distribute their advice, including the new website, social media, TT’s series of successful seminars and its recently introduced programme of webinars.

TT’s investment in digitisation looks not only to improve access to loss prevention materials, but also to better aid its Members with the management of their insurance. Available via its website, TM Connect is TT’s new online services platform, developed by TT Club’s managers Thomas Miller. It is designed to enhance online accessibility to services and data for Members and their brokers. “TM Connect affords 24/7 access to all insurance documents, whether it is policies, payments and debit notes, premium balances or claims records. Indeed, the portal acts as successor to TT’s venerated ClaimsTrac and undoubtedly represents the future of communication with our Members” said Fenton.

These latest investments by TT Club are clear signposts to a digital future in which the technological opportunities that continue to present themselves will be investigated. TT intends to further exploit such opportunities as appropriate to better serve its clients as they tackle the dynamic challenges constantly presented throughout the global supply chain.

*The investigation’s report entitled ‘Brave New World’ can be found here

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

TT Club invests to enhance the Motorway Buddy App

The freight insurer’s investment is seen as a significant initiative in developing a unified platform to help hauliers and drivers control the risks of theft and damage effecting the most vulnerable transport mode in the supply chain

London, 25th August 2020

Bringing together the existing technology of a reputable road haulage app and detailed crime data, which maps the cargo and fuel theft hotspots provided by the Freight Unit of the National Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service (NaVCIS), TT Club’s investment will enable informed decisions leading to a safer and more secure road freight sector.

The Motorway Buddy smartphone app is an established suite of products recognised by the UK government and trade organisations as the go-to truck stop locator for UK and European drivers. The app is a driver-friendly compliance and safety management tool, among other functions it provides the location of over 300 recognised truck stop facilities across the UK.

From its collaboration with BSI in producing an annual cargo theft report [click HERE], TT Club recognises that in Europe over 60% of reported cargo thefts occur in transit, typically in rest areas or unsecured parking areas. “There is a critical need for hauliers and drivers to be able to make informed risk decisions when it comes to parking their vehicle,” said TT Club’s Managing Director, Loss Prevention Mike Yarwood. “The development of Motorway Buddy, which we are funding, will enable a data-informed, proactive approach to a constantly evolving risk environment.”

The intention is for Motorway Buddy to become a unified platform, merging its existing truck stop and driver compliance functionality with the theft and crime data provided by NaVCIS to produce a series of heat maps visualising recorded cargo and fuel theft incidents. The data will be updated on a three-month rolling basis, with 12 months of data displayed at any one time.

Chris Holloway, founder of Motorway Buddy, said, “Since the inception of Motorway Buddy our team have always looked at ways of solving the logistics industry’s pain points. Having worked as a driver for over 20 years, and alongside trade associations for the past 9, it has become increasingly apparent that freight crime continues to be a major problem throughout Europe and we are now tremendously excited to be working with the TT Club and NaVCIS Freight to help solve this serious issue.”

The software development will begin immediately with a view to launching the enhanced features on the app in two to three months’ time. For account holders there will also be the ability to record parking facility characteristics (CCTV, secure fencing, and security guard) for future use by hauliers, and insurers if the need arises.

Additional functionality based on statutory driving hours will enable the driver to enter their statutory hours remaining and current location. The app will visually ring fence on the map where the driver can approximately reach within their driving time. The driver can then overlay this map with the crime data to make an informed decision as to where to park their vehicle.

“While available to foreign drivers, the app is in Polish and Romanian language as well as English, the extent of the heat map is currently limited to the UK, we would however envisage an eventual pan-European roll-out,” explained Yarwood. “TT remains committed to a core mission of increasing safety and security in the supply chain and sees this current initiative as part of its central role in allowing operators, in this case haulage managers, principals and drivers, access to data which informs their risk management decisions, as well as supporting liability assessments and possible litigation.”

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

About Motorway Buddy (MWB) App

The Motorway Buddy smart phone App is an established suite of products recognised by UK government and trade organisations as the go-to truck-stop locator for UK and European drivers. The App was developed in 2011 by a former HGV driver, as a driver friendly compliance and safety management tool. The App provides the location of over 300 recognised truck stop facilities across the United Kingdom. The App is currently available in English, Romanian and Polish.

www.motorwaybuddy.com

For more information on how to support the work of the NaVCIS’ Freight Unit and to help mitigate the risk of cargo theft, please contact freight@navcis.pnn.police.uk

TT Club Issues Fresh Guidance on Tank Container Operation

With an insurable interest in excess of 50% of the world’s tank container fleet, freight transport insurer TT Club has an intimate understanding of the sector. Its latest StopLoss guidance for tank container operators in managing risk in this element of the global supply chain contains valuable advice.

London, 18 August, 2020

Tank containers have been used in the international supply chain to distribute cargoes for many years. In March this year, ITCO, the International Tank Container Organisation released their 2020 Global tank container fleet survey. While covering a period prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the survey highlighted a slowdown in the growth of the global fleet in 2019 (7.88%) versus 2018 (10.81%). This was partially a consequence of the fall in global trading conditions experienced by many sectors of the container shipping industry.

On the positive side however, the fleet continues to expand. This can be attributed to shippers recognising the benefits of shipping their cargoes in tank containers (as opposed to drums or parcel tankers). The survey reported strong growth for Chinese domestic bulk liquid movement, as well as within the intra-Asia trade.

Having such a deep heritage in the insurance of the maritime containers, TT Club has used its experience of working with operators, answering their queries and handling their claims to create a StopLoss document, which can be accessed HERE

The StopLoss advisory follows on from the success of TT’s tank container seminar in late last year and further confirms the Club’s commitment to provide supportive understanding for those businesses entering or on the periphery of the industry as well as established operators. Additionally, TT collaborated with a number of industry and technical experts to produce this new guidance focused on managing tank container risk.

The intention of this publication is to identify and highlight common claims exposures, whether operational or connected with the care of the tank as an asset. The StopLoss provides a platform from which TT can disseminate this analysis output and provide guidance for the benefit of all. In line with other recently published work[1] by IMDG Code Compliance Centre the guidance seeks to bring clarity as to the responsibilities of the various stakeholders.

This practitioners’ good practice guide is aimed at all stakeholders through the tank container transport chain whether operating, filling, discharging, cleaning or handling tanks. Informed by typical incidents, the document is structured in such a way that it follows the natural chronology of the transport chain in order to provide ease of access.

The publication incorporates several pieces of valuable operational insight, with references to applicable regulations. In the interests of increasing the longevity of the tank as an asset, the topical subject of corrosion/pitting is extensively covered within the guidance, likely of interest to tank owners and operators. Those who operate in the tank sector or are considering doing so will find the 13-point checklist, which aids and informs consistent and successful outcomes for tank container operations, of particular interest.

ENDS

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com


[1] https://www.shashikallada.com/shippers-responsibilities-tank-containers/

Insurers pinpoint the complex causation of container casualties

Both the extent and pace of growth in container volumes have put strains on a wide range of operational procedures and the physical hardware employed to handle the steel boxes, particularly onboard ships. Attention to numerous factors is needed to avoid repeated casualties.

A webinar organised by the Thomas Miller managed insurance mutuals, container freight specialist TT Club and protection & indemnity insurer, UK P&I Club, revealed the diverse range of factors important to safe container ship operations and the security of the container stacks they carry. ‘Container Casualties – the sum of the parts’ looked in detail at the complex range of moving parts involved in these operations and concluded that each must be considered individually and collectively in order to keep collapse of stow incidents to a minimum.

In chairing the session, UK P&I Club’s Loss Prevention Director, Stuart Edmonston set the scene, “Container loss incidents attract attention. Overall, the industry loses a relatively small amount of roughly one unit per 160,000 carried but each loss has significance to a range of stakeholders, including the ship operators, cargo interests, insurers and, not least to the natural environment both at sea and on shore.”

A review of the webinar proceedings (https://vimeo.com/444176895) highlights the wide range of influences that can impinge on stack collapses on ships and the potential loss of containers overboard. Peregrine Storrs-Fox TT Club’s Risk Management Director took the lead in summarising these. “While adverse weather and the avoidance of it through to considered design and construction of container ships are clearly vital, the ‘moving parts’ of causation range through all aspects of container operations. TT Club is involved in all aspects of the container supply chain, but uniquely concentrates its energies on those factors considered within the Cargo Integrity campaign that have bearing on this type of casualty, such as the correct declaration of cargo mass as well as the safe packing and securing of the freight within the container, together with the container structure and maintenance.”

Ship-board factors run from proper inspection and regular maintenance of deck fittings, locking bars, twistlocks and lashing bridges, to the use of accurate data to predict parametric rolling and other ship motions, and the incidence of a so-called ‘stiff ship’ situation, at the design and construction stage. Neil Gardiner of casualty investigators, Brookes Bell lead the discussion on this area of causation. “In addition to taking into account the bending motions of ships in heavy seas in the design of, particularly, the larger container ships of today, operational prevention of isolated and unnecessarily high stacks coupled with high GMs should be prioritised,” advised Gardiner. “The whipping action that ships often experience can have a significant effect on high and isolated container stacks that may have been left between interim discharge/load ports to avoid restowing.”

From the legal perspective Tom Starr, Senior Claims Director at UK P&I pinpointed the difficulties in establishing causation and liability. “The very nature of the modern container shipping industry, the very large and sophisticated ships and the involvement of numerous parties means that evidencing seaworthiness, proper stowage and the cause of a casualty is a huge challenge,” explained Starr. “Add to this the variable investigation standards of flag states in conducting official investigations; it may be unsurprising that lessons learnt for the future can be speculative.”

From a plethora of audience questions, one was noteworthy: challenging the panel to suggest their most pressing improvement to oil the moving parts driving this issue. “It is a shame that the MARIN report Lashings@Sea was only partially followed through; there are a number of outstanding recommendations,” was Storrs-Fox’s answer. “That study itself was in relation to ships around 10,000 TEU, so less than half the capacity of the largest now in service. A second MARIN type research, picking up the unresolved actions, and drawing on developments in technology and the other factors would be valuable in increasing safety and certainty in shipping.”

For Gardiner more accurate data on the physical forces at play on containers stacks to be used in calculations at the ship design and construction phase and for Starr better communication between all parties. “When these casualties occur and are under investigation, it is only through more transparency about the actions of the moving parts that future incidents can be minimised,” he concluded. 

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

About UK P&I Club

The UK P&I Club is a leading provider of P&I insurance and other services to the international shipping community. Established in 1869 the UK P&I Club insures over 244 million tonnes of owned and chartered shipping through its international offices and claims network. ‘A (Stable)’ rated by Standard & Poor’s with free reserves of $505m, the UK P&I Club is renowned for its specialist skills and expertise which ensure ‘best in class’ underwriting, claims handling and loss prevention services.

The UK P&I Club is managed by Thomas Miller, an independent and international insurance, professional and investment services provider.

www.ukpandi.com

FIATA and TT Club congratulate regional winners of young international forwarders award

Geneva/London, 4 August 2020 – FIATA International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations and international freight transport insurer, TT Club, announce this year’s regional winners for the Young International Freight Forwarder of the Year Award (YIFFYA). For over 20 years, the award has been providing valuable training opportunities for young talent in the freight forwarding industry.

The YIFFYA has again attracted many talented candidates from around the world. Representing their respective companies and national associations, candidates submitted their dissertations earlier in the year, focused on demonstrating their expertise in freight forwarding. The dissertations sought to illustrate complex multimodal shipments of cargoes such as large crane assemblies, locomotives, halal meat and rainbow trout eggs. Many of the candidates this year were able to further demonstrate their expertise through inclusion of COVID-19 challenges, explaining how these were overcome.

TT Club recognises the importance of encouraging new talent in the freight forwarding business and has supported the competition with its sponsorship throughout the 20 years of the award’s history. Mike Yarwood, TT Club’s Managing Director, Loss Prevention and the Chair of the Award Steering Committee, commented “The awards continue to celebrate the achievements of young forwarders and both the Club and FIATA recognise the high standards of professionalism in our industry that must be exhibited in the most challenging of times. Throughout the current crisis – and for some time into the future – forwarders will be critical to the maintenance of an efficient and effective global supply chain.”

This year’s regional winners are:

  • Region Europe: Ms Femke Marie Fürst (DSLV – Germany)
  • Region Africa and Middle East: Ms Vimbai Loreen Manyumbu (SFAAZ – Zimbabwe)
  • Region Americas: Ms Anastasia Gureeva (CIFFA – Canada)
  • Region Asia Pacific: Mr Umair Aamir Sheikh (PIFFA – Pakistan)

FIATA President Basil Pietersen added his congratulations to the four winners, “Our award aims to contribute to the development of quality professionals and reward young talent. The entries this year were, as ever, of a high standard and drew from a wide range of dissertation topics. I am heartened by the exceptional work of all the entrants, which demonstrates the complexity of processes carried out within the global supply chain and the logistics skills required to serve it. In addition, they underline the need of forwarders worldwide to adapt quickly to regulatory, political and economic pressures.”

Traditionally, the four regional winners would present their dissertations to the Award Steering Committee at the FIATA World Congress, with final judging and the announcement of the global winner taking place during the event. Travel restrictions being as they are, there will be no congress held this year, so the judging will be completed remotely, with the regional winners’ entries being presented via videocall in October 2020.

Both FIATA and TT Club wish to thank all those individuals who entered this year’s competition and acknowledge their employers and national freight forwarding associations for the enthusiasm and commitment they have shown to ongoing training within the international logistics and freight forwarding sector.

About FIATA

FIATA International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations is the largest nongovernmental organization in the field of transportation. It is the global voice of freight logistics, representing an industry that covers approximately 40,000 freight forwarding and logistics firms, and employs around 10 million people in some 160 countries. www.fiata.com.

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more.

www.ttclub.com

TT Club forum examines the barriers to growth of autonomous freight transport

The forum, held via an interactive webinar entitled ‘Drones and autonomous vehicles: The future… now?’, presented the current advances in autonomous transport in the air, at sea and on land. It examined the benefits and limitations of the technologies as well as the accelerating effects on adoption within international supply chains brought about by the current crisis.

The development of drones, autonomous road vehicles and unmanned ships has been rapid in recent years. The benefits of such automation to freight transport infrastructure are often enumerated – sustainability, cost reduction, environmental protection and resistance to disruption. However, the adoption of such technologies has seen a degree of resistance due to concerns over safety, security, levels of investment and variable regulatory regimes.

“To provide a forum at which the pros and cons can be explained and debated was our primary aim,” says TT Club’s MD Loss Prevention, Mike Yarwood. “Some of the concerns about widespread use of autonomous transport methods, safety and security for instance, can be in fact improved in certain circumstances through the technology. At TT Club, one of our fundamental principles is the dissemination of best practice and risk mitigation across all modes. We feel therefore that an understanding of, and debate about, the implications of automation is vital for its responsible development.”

Participating in the forum under Yarwood’s guidance were: Svilen Rangelov, Co-Founder and CEO at Dronamics; Pranav Manpuria, CEO of autonomous truck developer, Flux Auto and Hussain Quraishi, Strategic Innovation Manager at Wärtsilä, a leader in smart technologies for marine and energy markets. Each emphasised the advantages of autonomy on the transport modes in which they specialise.

In the air, most notably Rangelov outlined the flexibility of drones in delivering cargo to smaller and possibly more remote centres of population as economically and as swiftly as larger cities. Speed to market for urgently required supplies, such has been seen during the COVID-19 crisis, was also emphasised.

Taking a broader slice of the supply chain, Manpuria suggested that driverless trucks could be slotted into a transport system that also features automated warehouses, ports and freight terminals. Computer-guided inventory selection, product picking and packing and lift-truck operations can be integrated with optimum road vehicle scheduling to improve supply chain efficiency.

At sea, the near-term benefits of autonomy including increased safety and voyage optimisation have already been realised. The medium-term benefits of reduced crew are expected to impact coastal cargo vessels the most, where crew expense forms a higher percentage of operating costs and where enhanced situational awareness and precise manoeuvrability is at a premium. Wärstilä’s autonomous technology in the marine sector is well advanced across smart sensors, smart routing and smart vessel control. The technology is demonstrable and has been proven to enhance safety and provide operational savings. 

So what of the barriers to more rapid development? “The COVID-19 crisis has certainly acted as an accelerant for change in potential adoption of autonomous technology, as it has in other aspects of supply chain management,” says Yarwood. “But significant barriers need to be overcome. Our panel identified a number of these and responded to concerns from the webinar’s participants around the world.”

As an obstacle, perhaps surprisingly, the level of investment required is not high on the list.  A lack of uniform regulation across national governments and even within countries is a major block to autonomous vehicle and drone deployment. This is an incidence of regulation and certainly international authorities not keeping pace with commercially driven technological advancement.

Environmental hazards such as bad weather, winds and high seas affecting drone operation and autonomous ships, and icy and rain-effected roads are seen as challenges that technology can cope with and the avoidance of human error is generally seen as an asset in improving safety. A vulnerability to cyber-attack that is perceived to increase with the use of computer-controlled vehicles is a strong disincentive to adoption, the forum concluded.

“However, this particular threat is of critical concern across the supply chain in general,” says Yarwood. “And autonomous transport with all its environmentally sound and economically tempting characteristics will continue to progress.”

A recoding of the webinar proceedings can be viewed here – https://vimeo.com/438946190

An overflow of Q&A’s can be found with this link: https://i.emlfiles4.com/cmpdoc/4/9/5/3/files/673720_drone-webinar-qa.pdf?dm_t=0,0,0,0,0

About TT Club

TT Club is the established market-leading independent provider of mutual insurance and related risk management services to the international transport and logistics industry. TT Club’s primary objective is to help make the industry safer and more secure. Founded in 1968, the Club has more than 1100 Members, spanning container owners and operators, ports and terminals, and logistics companies, working across maritime, road, rail, and air. TT Club is renowned for its high-quality service, in-depth industry knowledge and enduring Member loyalty. It retains more than 93% of its Members with a third of its entire membership having chosen to insure with the Club for 20 years or more. www.ttclub.com

DRONAMICS

www.dronamics.com

silven@dronamic.com

Flux Auto

pranav@fluxauto.xyz

https://fluxauto.xyz/

Wärtsilä

https://www.wartsila.com/marine

hussain.quraishi@wartsila.com